Machine room Strowager

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Note the raw material bar entering from the top right and the stamped piece parts towards the bottom left.IMG_20170312_0011

Output from a metal stamping machine, into a tote box, for moving to the next stage of drilling

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Stamp head of a machine tool.

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A close up of the contact on the end of the spring. The coils would activate the spring through an electromagnetic force caused by powering up the coils, thus making a phone connection.

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Stages of manufacture of relay yoke

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High speed relay design. Note the two coils.

 

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The sequence of springs and insulators which are built together to create a spring assembly.

 

 

 

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Before 1962

1962

Now, I always believed the story of Monkstown began in 1962, in some ways I was right but in a very interesting way I proved myself wrong. It was a visit to the new PRONI (Public Record Office Northern Ireland) on the week it opened that added a fascinating insight to the start of the story…
I am going to take a brief step back in time, into the previous decade…. A prequel, if you like.

1951

In the PRONI there are a number of very interesting documents which containing the working files from the Department of Commerce. Interestingly I found these on the opening day of the new PRONI premises in the Titanic quarter, which is another story.
COM/63/1/127-129 provides an insight into the early discussions with Standard Telephones and Cables about a factory initiation in 1951

In 1951 initial discussions were about Castlereagh or Laurelvale including an opportunity for 100-250 jobs.
There was comparison between Scotland or Northern Ireland for this new opportunity but even in those days the cost of rented sites in East Kilbride (at 5s 0d per sq. ft.) was seen as extremely high compared to Northern Ireland.

By 1953, after many meetings the opportunity moved on to Londonderry and a proposed factory for the manufacture of underwater cable with a potential for employment of 1,500. This opportunity also did not come to fruition.

Monarch

The discussion centred around whether a suitable jetty could be built and the Foyle dredged enough to enable STC to have their ships dock and be loaded. This was Submarine Cables Division in the era of the transatlantic cables.

This the the Monarch used by STC to lay the transatlantic cable.

Monkstown : Requiem for a village

51UmRxkW6RL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_ I found this very interesting book (Ref Roddie Andrews) in the Linen Hall Library.  It is a very personal look back at life in the village of Monkstown before and after the ‘American factories’ arrived in 1962.

The building of the Monkstown Industrial Estate was in the large meadow, owned by Nursery Owner Robert Kirkpatrick in the town land of Cloughfern.

It is a environmental change that I have read in a number of places but, in this book, the author Roddie Andrews comments on how the new factories “required lots of women with small hands” for the intricate work and how the women of the families in some cases “gained their independence” within the family due to the good wages paid.

Roddie Andrews mentions that the progress forced on the local area with employment contracts which required that employees “must work overtime as and when required” added huge strains to family life. “Another dehumanisation” was the introduction of Time and Motion on the work practices and incentive payments.

In my own memories even I can contrast the peaceful Boy Scout walks through the area when I was young to the queues of cars coming up the Doagh Road and trying to turn right onto the site across the daily commuter traffic jams. Living locally I always felt that the factories sat well within the community with a well understood co-dependence.

I guess STC and Spaldings were just two more causes for an influx of new people into the area following in the history of the Mill, Print Works and the garrison families from Carrickfergus.

As Roddie Andrews says the “1964 devastating news of the Housing Trust’s vesting orders” in preparation for the building of the Monkstown Estate was really the end of the Village structure.

With a population now over 85,000 in the wider Newtownabbey area, we can only look back with fond memories of the old Monkstown area where everyone knew everyone … .. and their mother.

Ref: Roddie Andrews:  Requiem for a village

Monkstown Plant Brings optimism to Ulster

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Kieran Mulligan arrived in my office one morning with a photocopy of STC News. He had heard I was producing this historical ‘book’ of the Monkstown site and people, and this was one of the oldest collection of photographs that I had seen at that time.

I guess these images and a fading memory are two of my drivers to make sure that we don’t lose our collective memory of what has been a real home for many of us for well over 30 years.

I am going to let the STC News words help this first generation tell their story. I also owe it to this generation to find better photographs and, with the help of Ken’s terrific photograph store in the print room, I have found most of the originals except for the one above, but my hunt continues.

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Panel wiring – and this is Mrs Margaret Clark performing the operation.

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In the Relay Adjusting Section Jean Watson, just five months with the company.

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Assembling a relay spring pileup is Victoria McKenna. This is one of several operations needed for relay assembly.

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Intently watching the wire strand on the coil winding machine is Marty Graham.

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Production Control, 17 year old Sandra Sweet prints off part numbers.

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Thomas Hagan, a setter/operator in the Machine Shop, fixes the feed on the horizontal automatic press. This turns out around 100,000 springs a day.

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Supervisor Jimmy Scullion(right) watches John Craig form a PABX line circuit in the Cable Forming Section – one of the basic jobs on a PABX.

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Monkstown has an up-to-date medical Section, under the charge of Sister ‘Paddy’ Morgan. Here Nurse Noelle Stewart is seen testing eyesight with ‘Mavis’, the Master Screen Viewer.

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A clerk in the Personnel Department, Gerry Shearer is also the Monkstown ‘disc jockey’ and as such is responsible for broadcasting over the factory public address system.

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Tommy Martin, a keen five-a-side footballer, works on selector mechanisms in the Mechanical Adjusting Department.

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A toolmaker, Jimmy Strain joined STC seven months ago. He is seen here marking out a fixture.

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In Self Wiring Section Mrs Nina Rice wires a UNI Selector Shelf. Nina is Italian by birth but married an Irishman 19 years ago and has seen much of the world in her travels.

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One of the most important sections is, of course, Payroll. Here Norma Hamilton is seen calculating wages and incentive payments on a Burroughs comptometer.

Excerpts: Acknowledgements to STC News

Monkstown : The local residents also claim that from nearby Knockagh one can see Scotland to the north and and the Mountains of Mourne to the south, not forgetting County Down itself and the glorious coastline all the way. But then we found that they are very proud of Monkstown and its surroundings. Their part of the world is Ireland and it is a fine place to live.

For the ‘settlers’, most of whom came over from Southgate with Plant Manager Mr Kenneth Frost to help start the project, there were many compensations, not least of them being the open roads, where cars can really keep moving and driving is still the pleasure it once was in crowded England. And, anyway, nearby Aldergrove Airport – an easily covered 15 miles away – brings London within an hour and ten minutes flying time, a short enough journey for any wanderer.

But mostly they have settled down. Talk to people like Jim Strugnell, Unit Production Manager of Panels and Equipment, Chief Inspector Arthur Walton, Production controller Les Calderwood, Plant Engineer Ernie Raven or Production Engineer Dudley Howard, all of whom came over right at the start of the project will tell you they really like it here – and they feel very much a part of the country.

It is only in recent years that new industry has been attracted to Ulster by availability of labour and by lively and untiring efforts of the Minister of Commerce. Today Ulster has a wide variety of modern industries and the STC plant is not only one of the showpieces but has contributed substantially to the economy of Northern Ireland and the well-being of Ulstermen.

The plant employs some 1600 people and is steadily approaching its ultimate target of 2000. This is spectacular growth – achieved only by enthusiasm, adaptability and spirit of all concerned, management, workers and trade unions. It has been a great challenge – but the Ulsterman is at his best under challenging conditions.

They are a happy and sociable people. So it is not surprising that Monkstown has a flourishing sports and social club, covering football, tennis, swimming, hockey, golf, netball, badminton, and table tennis, ballroom dancing, photography, angling, chess and including a ladies keep-fit class.

One of the most popular amenities of factory life is the twice-weekly record request programme. This is broadcast over the factory public address system every Tuesday and Friday with the 30 minute session being conducted by 19-year-old Gerry Shearer, a clerk in Personnel Department. During each programme eleven or twelve records are played, all requested by shop-floor operatives and usually taking the form of birthday and ‘boy friend or girl friend’ messages.

Gerry compiles the programme, which is pre-recorded, on tape the day before it is due to go out, thus allowing time for the elimination of any mistakes.

The programme itself typifies the spirit one finds in Monkstown. Life generally is good and there is a song in the air. And who better than Ulstermen at radiating happiness.

STC News

In their own words, like I said!!!  In today’s world of Twitter, WhatsApp and Blogs, it is still lovely to read about ‘recorded on tape’ not even cassette tape. I love it.

Official opening by Lord Brookborough in 1962

The official opening was on 26th July 1962 by Lord Brookborough at which time there were 300 people already working in the plant.

He was accompanied on his factory tour by the Plant Manager Mr Kenneth Frost. If you recognise any of the other folks in this photograph please reply with a message.

In the beginning Standard Telephones and Cables created Monkstown

It all started in 1962.  Actually, to my surprise, I discovered at the Public Record office that it started in 1951 … but that is a story for another day.

In 1962 it was the start of an Era which had a significant effect on thousands of families in Northern Ireland and many lifetimes of effort associated with Standards (Standard Telephones and Cables) and in more recent decades Nortel.

This blog is dedicated to all those great experiences and memories of all the great folks who worked in Monkstown on the Doagh road.

It is a story in our own words, based on our failing memories and the huge number of photographs that have been collected and are being retained and published to aid our failing memories.

Comments are very welcome.